• Young children who are hospitalized with head injuries may be at higher than average risk for developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) later on, a small study suggests. U.S. researchers examined data on 187 children, including 81 who were hospitalized overnight for a traumatic brain injury (TBI) at some point from age 3 to 7, and 106 who were hospitalized with other injuries. None of the kids had ADHD at the start.

  • High School athletes often raise money door-to-door for their teams. In Newton, Mass., a football player rang the doorbell of leading brain injury researcher Dr. Lee Goldstein. Instead of money, he got a talk. Goldstein cares a great deal about high school football. It's what he was thinking about when the doorbell rang.

  • “I use to be – I still try to be – outgoing and friendly to everybody. People knew me as the kid who was always smiling, and trying to make other people,” Salamone said. “And I’m trying to be happy again,” he adds, “but it’s a lot harder now.” Salamone is also at risk of losing the college education he worked so hard to obtain. After his injury, Vanguard University agreed to delay Salamone’s enrollment for one year, but he will lose his spot at the college and his scholarship if he is not ready to attend by the fall semester.

  • Anyone with an aging loved one likely knows the feeling: Wondering when and how you’ll recognize if your loved one needs help. But sometimes, the biggest concerns are often the silent ones. One of the most common causes of concern among older adults is traumatic brain injury - responsible for more than 80,000 emergency room visits each year among people over 65. While we often think of brain injury as a sudden, severe jolt to the head with obvious, immediate symptoms, brain injuries can take a much different shape in older adults.

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