• A study published online Thursday in Brain, a journal of neurology, presents the strongest case yet that repetitive hits to the head that aren't concussions — meaning there's no loss of consciousness or other symptoms that can include headaches, dizziness, vision problems or confusion — do cause CTE. "We've had an inkling that subconcussive hits — the ones that don't [show] neurological signs and symptoms — may be associated with CTE," says Dr. Lee Goldstein, an associate professor of psychiatry at the Boston University School of Medicine and the lead investigator on the study. "We now have solid scientific evidence to say that is so." And this evidence, he says, leaves researchers "terrifically concerned."

  • Researchers at Western University believe they have found a common link between the degenerative brain condition CTE, and a variant of ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Some people with the signs of CTE also show symptoms of a variant of the muscle-weakening disease ALS that causes cognitive impairment. Now, in a study published in Neurology, researchers think they may have found how the two brain diseases might be connected.

  • Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) may be present in 10% of relatively young patients with intractable epilepsy, a new pilot study suggests. The study was small and can't really determine whether relatively young patients with epilepsy who sustain head trauma because of their disorder are at higher risk for CTE. However, "this is a start," study investigator Gregory D. Cascino, MD, Department of Neurology, Division of Epilepsy, Mayo Clinic.

  • Two scientists at George Mason University have been working on a potentially groundbreaking diagnostic tool that could change the way we test for and treat brain injury across the sports world and beyond. Although their findings are still a ways from translating to a marketable product, they shed new insight into a field that many are only beginning to understand.

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