March is Brain Injury Awareness Month

  • Following a brain injury, people can lose their ability to see the left side of the world, but with a special set of lenses developed by researchers at Dalhousie University, patients can train their brains to see both sides of the world. Researchers are developing "prism-goggles" to help patients experiencing hemi-spatial neglect as a result of an injury to the right side of the brain, most commonly from stroke.

  • Advances in brain imaging and other technology have yielded a slew of metrics for measuring head impacts. The Holy Grail is to translate these data into biomarkers for diagnosing and preventing concussions. Researchers are racing to develop sensor systems that measure the forces the head sustains during an impact — with bioengineer David Camarillo among those in the lead.

  • In our clinical and research practice here at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), we have found that a number of children have visual issues after a concussion, but they're not typically visual acuity issues. This is something we'd like to get the message out about. The kids we see in our offices who have had a concussion often also have oculomotor issues, whether they are related to problems with smooth pursuits, saccadic function, or the vestibulo-ocular reflex function.

  • New research findings suggest mild blast trauma suffered by military personnel affects portions of the auditory system that have not been extensively studied after injuries occur, and this impairment might be diagnosed using well-established testing methods. The findings raise the possibility that noninvasive auditory tests could identify undiagnosed mild brain injuries earlier.

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