• The brain scan came as a surprise even to researchers who for years have been studying the relationship between brain disease and deaths of professional football players. Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriots tight end and a convicted murderer, was 27 when he committed suicide in April. Yet a posthumous examination of his brain showed he had such a severe form of the degenerative brain disease C.T.E. that the damage was akin to that of players well into their 60s. It was, a lawyer for his family said, in announcing the findings on Thursday, “the most severe case they had ever seen in someone of Aaron’s age.”

  • A high school football player who suffered a traumatic brain injury when he continued to practice after suffering a concussion can't sue his coach or school district, a federal appeals court panel has ruled. The simple fact is that no legal precedent was in place to hold the coach or the school liable when Sheldon Mann suffered his injury in November 2011, Judge Thomas I. Vanaskie wrote in the opinion by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.

  • our in five military service members who suffer brain injuries may be able to return to military or civilian work after they get treatment at inpatient rehabilitation facilities, a UK study suggests. Almost one-third of these service members can return to a full-time military job after intensive rehab, the study also found. The results suggest that the costs of treatment in residential rehabilitation programs can pay off in the long run, said Lieutenant Colonel Dr. Markus Besemann, a chief of rehabilitation medicine for the Canadian Forces Health Services and a lecturer at the University of Ottawa.

  • This fall, some of the most elite football players in the NFL and on college teams around the country have taken the field wearing a new kind of helmet. The Vicis Zero1 helmet looks almost identical to the standard football helmet, but it has a soft shell that crumples on contact—similar to an automobile bumper—reducing impact against the brain

Alert!
You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.