March is Brain Injury Awareness Month

  • Researchers reviewed the medical charts of 128 students who suffered a concussion during the 2014-2015 academic year at Northwestern University. Overall, the students took much longer to recover from a concussion than the national average of 7 to 14 days.

  • Researchers from Cincinnati Children's Hospital found that the impact of a traumatic brain injury, or TBI, in a child can have long-lasting effects years later. The study found that patients with mild to moderate brain injury are twice as likely to have developed attention problems when examined seven years after injury. The research also found that children with severe TBI are five times more likely to develop secondary ADHD than children without TBI.

  • A far-reaching federal study hopes to provide new detail for veterans suffering from a traumatic brain injury, or TBI. Early research from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs shows at least 20% of all veterans who fought in Iraq or Afghanistan have suffered a TBI. Many heal within weeks or months, but others suffer long-lasting implications. This study hopes to track 1,100 veterans over a 20-year period to learn more about the issue and how such an injury can best be evaluated or treated. Only 700 have signed up so far.

  • Concussions are something many people think are just a temporary injury, not realizing they can bring on other health issues. A West Fargo girl has been suffering from a concussion induced injury for nearly three years. It's changed how she and her family live. "I feel like I am not a normal kid," 15-year old Ashtyn Gooselaw said.

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