• Recognizing mild concussions is crucial for preventing deaths, and now there's a way to do that more accurately than ever before, with your blood.

  • A direct link has been found between concussions and Alzheimer’s disease. New research by the Boston University School of Medicine found that concussions will accelerate brain atrophy and cognitive decline in people who are already at a genetic risk for the disease.

  • Casey Dellacqua, who fell and hit her head during the 2015 China Open, missed nine months of competition while living struggling with post-concussive syndrome. “I couldn’t do anything, couldn’t focus, couldn’t read, watch TV, wasn’t on my phone. I couldn’t focus having a conversation with anyone. I was in this constant world of drowsiness. Then I started not being able to sleep properly. I kept asking the doctor, ‘When am I going to feel better?’ They said it was all normal, all part of concussion. It was a really hard injury for me to understand mentally, because it wasn’t like I had a sore shoulder...”

  • Explosions are insidious. Even if a blast doesn't deliver a conspicuous injury, it can inflict brain trauma that might not be evident until much later. The US Navy's Office of Naval Research doesn't want medics to wait, though. It's developing Blast Load Assessment Sense and Test (conveniently, BLAST), a sensor system that could determine whether or not an explosion's shockwave is likely to have injured your brain.

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