Brain Injury

  • Background

    Background

Acquired Brain Injury

Many times the words acquired brain injury (ABI) includes all forms of brain injury - traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), strokes, brain illness, and any other kind of brain injury acquired after birth. However, ABI does not include what are classified as degenerative brain conditions such as Alzheimer's Disease or Parkinson's Disease. 

An ABI is an injury to the brain, which is not hereditary, congenital or degenerative, that has occurred after birth. (It includes anoxia, aneurysms, infections to the brain, haemorrhage, viral infection e.g. meningitis, encephalitis or septicaemia, stroke (cerebral vascular accidents) and hypoxic brain injury (loss of oxygen to the brain.) 

While research has demonstrated that thinking and behavior may be altered in virtually all forms of ABI, brain injury is itself a very complex phenomenon having dramatically varied effects. No two persons can expect the same outcome or resulting difficulties.The brain controls every part of human life: physical, intellectual, behavioral, social and emotional. When the brain is damaged, some part of a person's life will be adversely affected.

Consequences of ABI often require a major life adjustment around the person's new circumstances, and making that adjustment is a critical factor in recovery and rehabilitation. While the outcome of a given injury depends largely upon the nature and severity of the injury itself, appropriate treatment plays a vital role in determining the level of recovery.

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